Trading Partners Of Canada Under The Nafta Agreement

Canada`s top 20 trading partners account for 94.0% of Canada`s exports and 91.9% of Canadian imports as of December 2016. [4] These figures do not include foreign direct investment or services. Mexico is the third largest trading partner of the United States and the second largest export market for U.S. products. In 2018, Mexico was our third largest trading partner (after Canada and China) and the second largest export market. Total trade in goods and services totaled $678 billion and this trade directly and indirectly supports millions of jobs in the United States. In 2018, the United States sold $265 billion in U.S. products to Mexico and $34 billion in services for a total of $299 billion in U.S. sales to Mexico. Mexico is the top or second largest export destination for 27 U.S. states. Overall, NAFTA has not been devastating or transformative for the Canadian economy. Opponents of the 1988 free trade agreement warned that Canada would become a glorified 51st state.

While this has not been done, Canada has also not closed the productivity gap with the United States. According to the OECD, the country`s GDP per hour worked was 74% of U.S. GDP in 2012. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is a treaty of the United States, Canada and Mexico. it came into force on 1 January 1994. (Since 1989, there has been free trade between the United States and Canada; NAFTA has extended this regime.) On that day, the three countries became the largest free market in the world – the combined economies of the three nations were $6 trillion and directly affected more than 365 million people. NAFTA was created to remove customs barriers for agriculture, manufacturing and services; Eliminating restrictions on investment protection of intellectual property rights. This should be done while respecting environmental and labour concerns (although many observers point to the fact that the three governments have been negligent in environmental and safety at work since the agreement came into force).

Small businesses were among those expected to benefit the most from the removal of trade barriers, as this would reduce trade activity in Mexico and Canada and reduce the administrative burden associated with importing or exporting goods.